Tuesday, March 27, 2007

A Spectrum of Perspectives About Autism

Much of what passes for discussion of autism issues on the internet is either congratulatory back slapping and in group high fives or it is bitter acrimonious sniping. I have been pleased over the last few days to be able to engage in rational e-mail discussion with Lisa Jo Rudy of About Autism.com. Ms. Rudy is the parent of a higher functioning autistic child. My son is diagnosed with a lower functioning classic Autism Disorder. Her site tends to feature links to several prominent anti-autism cure, neurodiversity blog sites such as Autism Vox, Neurodiversity, Autism Hub, Autism Diva, Mom-NOS etc.

Notwithstanding her affinity for the neurodiversity perspective and my aversion to that socio-political movement we were able to exchange views rationally on such topics as curing autism, autism realities etc. I give Ms. Rudy most of the credit for that. She has also taken the generous step of referencing my perspective and this blog site on About Autism.com actions which I genuinely appreciate. I thank Ms. Rudy for her calm rational discussion of autism issues with someone from outside the neurodiversity perspective. Ms. Rudy's words about a spectrum of autism perspectives are worth remembering.

A Spectrum of Perspectives on the Autism Spectrum
If autism is a spectrum disorder, then it seems reasonable that there should be a spectrum of perspectives on that disorder. At one end of that spectrum are the neurodiversity advocates who feel that autism is a difference to be celebrated; on the other end are those who work toward and advocate a cure for autism. Both groups are passionate, and both believe deeply in their own points of view - with some people, like me, sharing elements from both perspectives.

Harold Doherty is a Canadian blogger and the father of a young man with classic autism. Having seen some of the more frightening ways in which the world can treat a person with profound autism, he believes strongly in the importance of seeking treatments and potential cures. All this while supporting and loving his son:

"I love my son dearly. I have just returned from walking about our community with him, enjoying his company. As I typed this note he very affectionately grabbed me from behind and hugged me - while squeezing forcefully on my windpipe. He did so without any aggressive intent but without understanding the potential consequences of his actions.

That is autism reality."



mcewen said...

It is indeed a spectrum both for the autistic and for their parents. I particularly relate to your mention of the affectionate cuddle that cuts off breathing as it's so hard to describe, yet for us at least, commonplace.
Best wishes

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much! It's a pleasure to e-meet you and so many other parents who are fighting to make their children's lives better.


Lisa Rudy