Monday, September 22, 2008

Autism Position of the Liberal Party of Canada

The Liberal Party of Canada recognizes the challenges that autistic Canadians face, as well as those affected by autism. That is why we had invested $16.2 million in autism research grants, which funded 32 separate projects. Although the delivery of health care services falls under provincial and territorial jurisdiction, a Liberal government would be open to discussions with the provinces, territories and relevant stakeholders about considerations for those who are living with or affected by autism.

Although the delivery of health care services falls under provincial and territorial jurisdiction, a Liberal government would be open to discussions with the provinces, territories and relevant stakeholders about considerations for those who are living with or affected by autism."

The above information follows a backgrounder on autism and autism issues in Canada from the perspective of the Liberal Party of Canada. This information was provided by a Liberal Party staffer to a representative of an autism organization and appears to be the official Liberal Party position. It essentially offers dialogue but makes no commitments for federal funding of autism treatment. It is a very weak and disappointing statement from the party of Charlottetown MP Shawn Murphy, the author of private members Bill C-304, which sought amendment of the Canada Health Act to include ABA treatment for autism. Most Liberal MPs, including Stephane Dion, voted in support of that motion. Now they make no commitment except to talk in the future.

Meanwhile autistic children across Canada will be going without the effective treatment they need.



1 comment:

Marni Wachs (Zuke) said...

Maybe there is a way to unite the vast majority of the autism community into a single entity that is heard. That is, ABA advocates with some other groups that exists out there.

I know nobody wants to compromise their vision, but ultimately numbers = action. Like anything that people are passionate about, divisions develop and tend to keep us from being a formidable group, when we hae so much in common. We're all trying to help our kids (or ourselves for those with ASD) to live the very best possible overall quality of life, including being a contributing member of society if possible in the functional economic sense.

What do others think?