Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Autism Reality in Queensland Australia


In Autism poses daily challenges the Rockhampton Morning Bulletin reports on some of the challenges facing the Filmer family in Queensland, Australia whose 3 sons have all been diagnosed with autism. All three have different levels of difficulty with communications:

ANDREW, 7, appears to be a very normal child, but he struggles to participate and is lagging behind his peers.

Douglas, 5, doesn't really know how to speak at all and communicates through a picture book and sign language.

And Rory, 3, can't always find the right words to use and is confused about how to interact with others.

The Filmers have to deal with their sons' range of communication skills, their sensory issues and public behavior challenges. They can rarely get out to dinner or a mall to go shopping with their three sons. The Filmers are facing autism reality in Queensland, Australia.

Autism reality is not all about a few high functioning persons blogging on the internret, appearing before judicial and political tribunals or media cameras and claiming to speak on behalf of all"autistics". For some persons with actual Autisticm Disorders, and the families who love and care for them, the realities of autism are a very challenging part of daily, family life. Whether that daily life takes place in New Brunswick, Canada or Queensland, Australia.




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3 comments:

Julie said...

Hi Harold. I just found your blog and read the Herald Sun article because of it. I live in Melbourne Australia and it is one of our daily newspapers! I wrote a reply to the article as I feel it highlighted some issues but not enough! If I can be indulgent I'll post my comments on the article here as they may not get printed in the Herald Sun. "Well done, Herald Sun, for publishing Alan Howe's article "The victims of autism". Like the bushfire victims, these children and adults deserve to be helped and afforded the opportunity to live happy, dignified and purposeful lives. Yes, the reality is that it is a devastating disorder for the person on the spectrum and also the person's family. The alarming increasing numbers do make it an imperative that must not be ignored by government and professional bodies. Too often a diagnosis of autism was an excuse for nothing to be done. However, much can be done to reach and teach these children. However, the quote attributed to Bruce Tonge that autism is "largely inherited" does not go far enough to acknowledge that there is an environmental component which affects these genetically susceptible people. Much can be done to improve the biochemical and medical conditions of people with autism and this is being studied, thankfully, overseas and here in Melbourne at Swinburne University's SABRI research facility. Other families have had much success implementing biomedical approaches and their success stories should be heard, celebrated and help to inform professionals and families of new positive paradigms for treating autism."

Julie said...

Hi Harold. I saw your blog and this article and I live in Melbourne where it's one of our major daily newspapers! (the power of networks!) I thought it made valid points but didn't go far enough. This was my reply which probably won't get published!
"Well done, Herald Sun, for publishing Alan Howe's article "The victims of autism". Like the bushfire victims, these children and adults deserve to be helped and afforded the opportunity to live happy, dignified and purposeful lives. Yes, the reality is that it is a devastating disorder for the person on the spectrum and also the person's family. The alarming increasing numbers do make it an imperative that must not be ignored by government and professional bodies. Too often a diagnosis of autism was an excuse for nothing to be done. However, much can be done to reach and teach these children. However, the quote attributed to Bruce Tonge that autism is "largely inherited" does not go far enough to acknowledge that there is an environmental component which affects these genetically susceptible people. Much can be done to improve the biochemical and medical conditions of people with autism and this is being studied, thankfully, overseas and here in Melbourne at Swinburne University's SABRI research facility. Other families have had much success implementing biomedical approaches and their success stories should be heard, celebrated and help to inform professionals and families of new positive paradigms for treating autism." Great to see ypour passion for supporting your son Conor and for trying to get the truth and reality understood. I too have a son, Ken, who is quite affected. very intelligent and very misunderstood, both in tern=ms of his needs and possibilities. Keep up the good work! Cheers Julie

Stephanie Lynn Keil said...

This reminds me of my own family. Most people find us obnoxious and rude and we can never figure out why. I'm the only one with an official autism dx, but I often wonder about everyone else in my household.